FAQ: Travel to Norway

People travel to Norway from all over the world. Some people travel to take up residency in Norway due to work, study or family relations. Some people come to Norway to seek protection as refugees. Most travelers to Norway come as tourist. Norway has two official written languages, Bokmål and Nynorsk. In addition, most official information and websites are also available in Sami, the language of Norway’s indigenous population. The majority of Norway’s population speak English, and many also speak a third language like German, French or Spanish. A collection of miscellaneous facts about Norway is available in the publication Minifacts about Norway, issued each year by Statistics Norway.

A collection of miscellaneous facts about Norway is available in the publication Minifacts about Norway, issued each year by Statistics Norway.

 

FAQ 1: Tourism

FAQ 2: Customs regulations

FAQ 3: Medical expenses

FAQ 4: Bringing urn and ashes to Norway

FAQ 5: Marriage in Norway

FAQ 6: Driving on a foreign drivers licence in Norway

FAQ 7: Moving to Norway

FAQ 8: Study in Norway

 

FAQ 1: Tourism

Norway is a popular tourist destination with amazing experiences such as the northern lights or the midnight sun north of the Arctic Circle, the world-famous Norwegian fjords, spectacular mountains and glaciers. In addition Norway offers shopping, exciting food, music, art and culture.

The official tourist website for Norway is VisitNorway.com. There you can find information regarding places to see, things to do, accommodation, transport, maps, travel tips and much more. Many places in Norway also have their own version of the website, e.g. VisitOslo.com, VisitBergen.com, VisitSvalbard.com etc.

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FAQ 2: Customs regulations

For information relating to Norwegian customs regulations, please see our website

When travelling to Norway, you may bring medicines for personal use. There are limits to the amounts you can bring with you. For information on how much you can bring with you and documentation requirements when travelling, please contact Legemiddelverket.

If you are travelling with pets to or from Norway, you should contact the Norwegian Food Safety Authority prior to the trip in order to establish which rules apply.

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FAQ 3: Medical expenses

As a tourist from a country outside the EU/EEA and Switzerland, you are not entitled to reimbursement by the Norwegian National Insurance Scheme for medical treatment you receive. Nor are you entitled to subsidisation of your return journey to your home country. You may however have certain entitlements from your own country. You should investigate this before you travel. In all events, we recommend that you take out travel insurance. 

If you are a resident of Australia on holiday in Norway, you are entitled to urgent necessary medical treatment in accordance with the special agreement between Norway and Australia

You can also be reimbursed for necessary expenses on giving birth and for oxygen therapy and dialysis. Note that the agreement does not apply to students or diplomats.

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FAQ 4: Bringing urn and ashes to Norway

For information relating to bringing urn and ashes to Norway, please see our website.

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FAQ 5: Marriage in Norway

For information relating to getting married in Norway, please see our website.

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FAQ 6: Driving on a foreign drivers licence in Norway

For information relating to driving in Norway, please see our website.

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FAQ 7: Moving to Norway

Practical information from public offices for migrants to Norway is available on the website New In Norway. There you will find information about moving to Norway, housing, education, work, health etc.

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FAQ 8: Study in Norway

Study in Norway is the official gateway to higher education and research in Norway. There you can find lists Norwegian universities and university colleges, master programs taught in English, scholarships etc. In addition, you will find practical information about the education system and about living in Norway.


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